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Останнє оновлення:
23.03.2017


Case-lesson “The delicious art”
Case-lesson “The delicious art”

Category: Art

Level (grade): 7 – 11

Subject: The art of confectionery

Objective: To reveal confectionery secrets and learn about “delicious technologies of tomorrow”

What information is waiting for me here?

  • What is “sweet geometry”?
  • What if the “formula” of a pastry?
  • Why are there bubbles in chocolate?
  • How to print a cake?
  • What fundamental and practical knowledge will I need?
  • How to “paint” pastries?
  • What chocolate is now in vogue?
7 scans of the subjects, phenomena and practices:
Introduction

To brew a cup of tea and print some fresh pastries… No, it’s not a fantasy but a completely real “scenario”. After all, culinary printers already exist:

Some skeptics will say: “And what about soul? Where’s the warmth of a confectioner’s hands? Where are the flight of their imagination, thoughts and dreams?”

But is it not a dream and imagination of not only confectioners but engineers and scientists, their search for creativity, “burning” with an idea, which are embodied in these “soulless” machines? The world is evolving, moving from “technology in service of art” to “the art of technology”! So why not to make this new art tasty in addition?

Geometry

Complex surfaces, rotating bodies, hyperboloids, ellipsoids… No, it's not the content of geometry textbook. These are a few examples of surfaces of pastries – delicious and “trendy”. These pastries are made by a talented architect and confectioner Dinara Casco. In creation of her masterpieces she has implemented complex architectural ideas. How do you like this sweet beauty?

 

This series is called “Geometry”. Dinara construct shapes in 3D MAX. Firstly the desired shape is modeled on computer, then it is printed by a 3D printer, polished, casted and grinded, and, in the end, it is casted of silicone.

 

“The main theme of my works is the connection of architecture and confectionary art, modeling and printing of the models, work with silicone. In this very case I use the principle of triangulation to create a three-dimensional surface.” The creative confectioner explains. What is triangulation? In terms of geometry, triangulation, in general meaning, is the division of a geometrical object into simplexes – the repetitive elements. For example, on the plane it’s splitting into triangles, hence the name. Various branches of geometry use different definitions of this term.

And how does geometry characterize such surfaces as these of fantastic candies? Of course, using formulas and dependencies that contain variables! Even in the simplest pastry you can identify such geometric elements as cube, sphere, cone, parallelogram… If to talk about the “filling” of a pastry, about its layers, we should probably use volume formulas. If to talk about coating a pastry with glaze, delicious mastic or marzipan, then the surface area of the goodies and its respective formula are important!

Here’s how mathematics (geometry) would describe such delicious geometric object:

 

Surely, all this seems to be a joke, but only as long as there is no need for modeling forms for sweet masterpieces. This is when complex formulas and geometric calculations come to our aid, as they will be operated by modeling programs.

The surface of sweets can be quite complicated, as you may have noticed. Simple formulas are not sufficient anymore! What’s then? Then we use more “advanced” formulas to describe them, or, speaking mathematical language, the formulas for, second-order surfaces.

Let’s examine some types of these complex surfaces. Such surfaces are three-dimensional, as they “grow” when you change certain coordinates of flat surface. Each point of a surface in three-dimensional space is characterized by three coordinates. Then the surface is described by the following equation:

 

If coefficients of the equation change, the form of the surface changes accordingly.

All types of complex surfaces will be individual cases when implementing of this equation. Which cases? Let’s look at the most “popular” amongst them.

The cylindrical surface appears when its directrix is given by the second order curve:

Elliptical cylinder; Parabolic cylinder; Hyperbolic cylinder

If for any point on the surface, for example, M, the straight line passing through M and O belongs entirely to this surface, this surface is conical.

 

Surface S is called surface of revolution around the OZ-axis if for any point of this surface a circle, passing through this point in a space with a centre and radius r, fully belongs this surface. And what types of surfaces of revolution are there?

 

Now, this is how pastries, described in “geometric language” would look like!

Task:


Try to “guess” a pastry, more precisely its form. You should gather into teams to do it. The teams think of a form of some pastry for their opponents and describe it in “geometric language” – via formulas that characterize the surfaces of their pastries (don’t forget to draw your own sketch of a pastry). Don’t forget that you are not obliged to use complex surfaces exceptionally, you can also use relatively simple elements: parallelepipeds, cubes, spheres, cones, cylinders, pyramids!

And the opponent team has to draw their perspective of appearance of those pastries. The team that comes to the truth the closets – wins!

Technology

The contemporary confectionery art is incredible technological! It uses many technological advances of the modernity. Do you still not believe that?

For example, Dinara Casco uses extremely complex forms for her cookies, which she first models in the program 3D MAX, and then prints them on a 3D printer.

But modern technology allows to print not only forms but sweets themselves! Several of these “culinary” printers were presented to the public in 2014. For example, this printer prints cookies and biscuits of rather complex shapes. And you can download these shapes from the Internet:

Since chocolate is plastic enough and hardens quickly – it is the excellent material for edible 3D printing:

Note the “stratification” of the printing.

So, chocolate is the vital element of many sweets and desserts. But it also is a result of technological processing of raw materials. The “standard” scheme of chocolate production is the following:

 

But in addition to the classic chocolate there is also “non-standard” aerated chocolate. How do these bubbles “get” into chocolate? Do you have an idea? Some may say that chocolate can be whipped and chocolate froth can be quickly cooled to freezing. And someone may suggest filling chocolate mass with gas (e.g., such as in carbonated water) and let it cool down slowly… That is, we have one more “technological” question: how are bubbles in aerated chocolate formed?

 

In fact, for aerated chocolate several production technologies are known. The essence of the first of them is a special turbine, which is located between the liquid chocolate mass collector and tempering machine (where chocolate is melted and then carefully kneaded and where it begins to “become chocolate”). Chocolate mass froths in this special low speed turbine. During this process overpressure of gas, which is created inside the turbine, facilitates the intense saturating of the chocolate mixture with carbon dioxide and nitrogen. And when they are released, they leaveblank spaces.

Uniformity of distribution of bubbles across the bar of chocolate, as well as their size, is directly dependent on the technological parameters of the turbine or the foaming node. And each manufacturer of aerated chocolate has their own regimes and, of course, their own secrets of aerated chocolate manufacturing.

The second technology of production of aerated chocolate differs from the first so that the finished chocolate mass, poured in forms by three quarters, is placed in a so-called vacuum-pot, where it is left for a few hours in airless space at temperatures above 40 degrees. Air bubbles in the chocolate mass expand, forming voids or bubbles.

Thus, the secret lies in frothing, gas saturation and pressure, or rather vacuum!

So, we’ve dealt with chocolate. And what to do with those pictures that can be seen on some desserts? Does a confectioner draw them with a brush?

 

Not at all! Another confectionery miracle of our time is printers that print on special sweet “paper”. Such printers are also called confectionery aerographs, and for large sweets – plotters. Here’s how they work:

The special technology concerns not only chocolates or special paper. Incredibly convenient, tasty and inspiring material for confectionery is caramel. Its parameters, balance of solidification and plasticity allow to create sculptures and compositions. For instance:

Question:


Think about modern technology that could be useful for a confectioner in work with caramel?

Task:


Have you noticed how a 3D printer works? It prints a product layer by layer. So the teams will have to “work” with such printer. However, your material will be not chocolate or sweet dough but mass for sculpting or plasticine. So consumption of this product is not recommended.

A teacher offers students a sample (not very complicated pastry that is produced in layers). Here are some ideas for inspiration:

 

Now the teams have to replicate this “masterpiece”, each team member creates only one layer! So the players will have to think about strategy and calculate the required operations.

The team that accomplishes the task faster – wins. The quality and “similarity” of the pastries should be taken into account as well.

Chemistry

Many modern confectionery masterpieces impress with bright colors. What dyes are used to create the sweet beauty? Your answer is apparently food colorings. But which exactly? What makes a coloring edible? And are all of them harmless? And maybe there are even beneficial colorings? Let's figure it out together.

 

Colorings can be very dangerous, prohibited, harmful, partly harmful (harmful to certain organs or body parts), harmless and… beneficial.

For example, the red coloring (among E-numbers it was given the code E-160d) Lycopene. Lycopene is a natural food coloring, which is obtained by extraction from tomatoes or through biotechnological synthesis from some types of fungi. Sometimes it is even recommended as anticarcinogenic product. It is used not only for coloring culinary and confectionery but also as a biologically active additive. Or the coloring for obtaining orange and yellow colors (E-160a) carotene/Carotenes. This yellow-orange coloring, better known as provitamin A, is an antioxidant, and also carcinogen. Much carotene is contained in plant foods such as carrots, spinach, lettuce, parsley, chives, sorrel, red pepper, blackcurrants, blueberries, gooseberries, peaches, apricots.

Natural carotene is an additional source of vitamin A and an antioxidant; it helps normalize blood pressure and vision. This coloring can obtain both water- and fat-soluble forms, and it is sufficiently resistant to light and temperature impact, which is why it is quite widespread in the food industry.

Food colorings are produced not only atfactory productions; there are recipes to create them at home. For example:

But how to calculate the amount of coloring that you need to add to obtain certain shade of dough, cream or icing? Now chemistry will come to your aid with its long proven methods!

If a color is obtained by mixing few “basic” colorings, the following tip will be useful. For instance, we have mixed 5 g of yellow coloring and 3 g of dark green coloring to create a “spring green” shade of cream. Suppose the recipe says that the concentration of the solution of the coloring for the cream should be 20%. How to make the solution of the desired concentration of this amount of coloring-powder?

 

But what to do if you have already prepared solution of certain concentration but the color is not so well-looking… What to do, how to save the situation? First of all, you need to understand how much coloring-powder you should add to get the desired shade. Secondly, you need to understand what concentration of the coloring solution you have got after adding of the coloring.

So, firstly, we do the following: we add the coloring gradually, in small portions, until we get the desired color. It is better to make the weight of these portions equal, so it is easier to calculate how much coloring we have already added. For instance, let’s use the portions of 1 g each.

Then we recalculate the concentration and consult with a recipe or our “sense of beauty”, just in case.

 

These simple methods will allow you to create products of your desired color and shade!

Try to accomplish the task to consolidate this skill.

Task:


The task is best handled as a team game. To conduct it a teacher has to prepare a “colored puzzle”: in a graduated cylinder or a glass they prepare colored solution (e.g., green) of two colorings (blue and yellow will be suitable for creation of green).

The task for the students is to replicate this solution, using initial solutions of yellow and blue colorings. These “initial” colorings remain on the teams’ worktables. They will also need an empty “working” cylinder or glass where the students will mix their solutions to obtain the required color and shade.

They should not only replicate the color but also estimate (or even guess) the amount of each solution the teacher has mixed. The most “precise” and “accurate” team wins.

The teacher can complicate the task by giving the teams the next objective: not only to mix solutions to get the necessary color but also to calculate the concentration of this “new” solution. Then the teacher tells the students the initial concentrations of coloring solutions or the weight of the colorings in them.

It is better to limit this competition in time, estimating how long it can take in advance.

Physics/Practice of cooking

To answer the question of why well-cooked chocolate glitters, why sometimes whitish plaque appears on chocolate and how to fight it, we have to turn to physics.

The secret of chocolate glitter lies in a physical phenomenon called crystallization. The correct crystallization of cocoa butter, contained in chocolate, is what will guarantee the “gloss” of chocolate. Confectioners call the process of obtaining shiny chocolate “tempering” (this term has already been mentioned when talking about technologies of chocolate creation). What is crystallization? Physicists, chemists and technologists by crystallization mean transition of matter from the gaseous or liquid state to solid, that is, the phase transition.

For confectioner the most important option is “liquid – solid” and not for all chocolate mass but for cocoa butter in it! The beauty of a chocolate product and how convenient and smooth chocolate icing will be depend on how good and “right” cocoa butter crystallizes.

 

Technologists draw special graphs of “correctness” of chocolate tempering, based on which confectioners can deduce how long and at what temperature the process should occur to create “perfect” chocolate:

 

If the temperature conditions of the process have been violated, then we get white “gray” plaque. For example, you put a chocolate bar in the sun and forget about it for a while. It has melted a little; you’ve come to your senses and tried to “save” it by putting it to the refrigerator. Now you have the “gray” chocolate bar, because the temperature in the sun and, especially, in the refrigerator, does not meet the conditions of “ideal tempering” at all… Farewell to the gloss!

Everyone can try themselves in the role of confectioners or chocolatiers. To feel it you should try to create a chocolate figure by yourself. The required elements are patience, a chocolate bar, water, a saucepan or a bowl for chocolate and confectionery molds or containers for its freezing. Although you can just use parchment paper:

Task:


Try to compare the “successfulness” of black, milk and white chocolate solidification. You can work in teams or conduct a home experiment and share the results in the classroom.

Anatomy

Some people say that eating sweets is harmful. Some insist on its benefits, the energy value of sweet products. Some state that chocolate is sweet provider of happiness. Who is right? Perhaps, the truth is somewhere in between?

So, there is a “legend” that chocolate lifts your spirits. Does it have at least some scientific basis? Yes, and the main “wizard” is tryptophan! Once in the body, tryptophan is converted into serotonin – one of the most important hormones and most active neurotransmitters, i.e. substances through which nerve cells transmit impulses, “communicating” with each other and muscle tissue. Excess or lack of such substances is exactly what leads to various “special effects” such as mood swings.

The connection between chocolate and mood is even proven scientifically. Michael Macht and Johannes Müller have conducted an experiment. The study has consisted of two phases: in the first phase they have showed three groups of volunteers small videos (sad, happy or neutral) after what they’ve given one half of each group a piece of chocolate, and the other half – a glass of water. Then they’ve asked to estimate their mood changes. Here is an illustration from their article about the experiment:

 

They have discovered the following. Those participants, who have watched a sad video, had suffered the most severe mood swings: firstly it had declined, and then significantly improved but only for those who had eaten chocolate. At the same time, for the audience who had watched happy and neutral videos the difference between chocolate and water has been negligible. What is the conclusion? Chocolate works especially effective when you feel really sad and “want magic”. If everything is fine, it is unlikely to give you extra happiness.

But sweets don’t consist of chocolate alone. They are also carbohydrates. And how do they behave in the body? Here’s their “path” in our digestive system:

 

Food carbohydrates in the digestive tract break down into monomers under the action of glycosidases – enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of glycoside bonds. Digestion begins already in the mouth: the saliva contains amylase enzyme that cleaves glycosidic bonds.

The main place of digestion of carbohydrates is the small intestine where amylase comes as a part of pancreatic juice. Amylase cleaves glycosidic bonds in random places, resulting in formation of oligosaccharides and maltose disaccharide (amylase does NOT hydrolyze disaccharides). Disaccharides sucrose and lactose also enter the body with food.

Oligosaccharides and disaccharides are hydrolyzed by specific glycosidases of the small intestine. These enzymes are synthesized in the cells of the intestine. They are not secreted but form large complexes onto the cell surface. These complexes differ in substrate specificity: the complex that breaks down oligosaccharides (and maltose), the sucrose-isomaltase complex and the lactase complex.

Products of complete digestion of carbohydrates are monosaccharides: glucose, galactose and fructose; they enter the bloodstream through the intestinal cells.

During the absorption from the intestine into the blood monosaccharides penetrate cell membranes via facilitated diffusion, with the help of special carriers.

The cells of the body “use” glucose, galactose and maltose to receive energy.

Thus, carbohydrates are important components of food. They are needed for energy metabolism and for the “correct” hormonal background! The main thing is not to overdo and use reasonable approach…

History/Geography

“Sweet geography”… Is it real? It is if to talk about ways of distribution or places of origin of sweets.

Let’s try to lay some sweet “routes”. The first one will be the chocolate.

Mexico can be considered the motherland of chocolate. The Spaniards, after capturing large territories of native Indian Empires, had tasted pleasant but bitter drink based on cocoa beans. Tribes of the Maya, Toltecs and Aztecs of Central America used to call this bitter but fancied drink “xocolatl′”.

The ancient Mexican legend says that god Quetzalcoatl, who was portrayed as a serpent covered with feathers, gave people the great cocoa tree so they could appreciate the taste of divine food.

A famous Swedish scientist and naturalist Carl Linnaeus, who gave names to most of the plants, called the cocoa tree Theobroma cacao L., which translated means precisely “the food of gods”.

 

Chocolate “arrived” to Europe in 1520, with the army of Cortes when he brought Charles V a lot of gifts after the returning from Mexico to Madrid. Cocoa was amongst them. It has become known in Europe since then, although Spain had long kept the sources of cocoa secret.

 

Only since 1608, when the Florentine Antonio Carletti brought cocoa to Italy from the West Indies, it has gradually begun to penetrate into other European countries.

With the addition of sugar and some other ingredients the drink of cocoa beans has received the name “chocolate” (from the Aztec word “chocolatl”)! Thus the “triumphant march” across the chocolate planet has begun.

Chocolate “got” to Japan only in the 19th century. And at first it did not spark much interest as it was expensive (there was no Japanese production of chocolate). But with the development of their own chocolate art, it has become super popular and even acquired distinctive Japanese features.

During World War II chocolate production in Japan stopped due to the complete lack of raw materials – cocoa beans. And then the Japanese found a way out of the situation: they began to use other raw materials for chocolate manufacturing, which were lily bulbs and sweet stevia.

Gradually, the use of unusual materials for chocolate production has become the “visiting card” of Japanese chocolate. For example, in Japan you can try sweets made of grape, peach, pumpkin or lemon chocolate!

 

And what are the traditional Japanese sweets? This, for example, is wagashi. For their creation confectioners use natural products: legumes (mostly red beans), rice, various types of yam, agar-agar (vegetable gelatin), chestnuts, herbs and tea.

Wagashi differs by less sweet flavor than sweets, familiar to Europeans. They may even seem not sweet at all to people who are not used to them.

 

If the route of chocolate spreading is clear, what was the route of no less popular caramel?

Caramel in Latin means “sugar cane”. As it is known from historical sources, the ancient Indian Dalits (representatives of the caste of the Untouchable) had roasted stalks of sugar cane in the fire and enjoyed something like the modern caramel.

Although, historically, the very first sweet delicacy was honey, which did not require any processing, caramel ranks first in the category of “man-made sweets” because without the use of human thought and devices, albeit primitive, caramel will hardly be possible to produce.

 

Sugar itself, which is the main raw material of caramel production these days, in the Middle Ages and a little later was considered a very expensive product and could be enjoyed only by wealthy people. At those times, so-called sugar “heads” or cones were used. The weight of such sugar “happiness” could vary from 400 g to 16 kg; everything depended on technology of production. And the color of this sugar was also unusual – blue.

Caramel became popular only in the 14th – 16th centuries. A little later (since the 18th century), Americans have been the first to cook caramel in special deep copper boilers. And they have also been the first who used it in production of toffees, while Europeans at that time preferred lollipops. Lollipops on sticks (these were also caramel!) have gained huge popularity in Russia and France.

 

Thus, conventionally, the birthplace of caramel is India. And what other traditional and popular sweets are there? For example, the ladoo (laddu). These sweets are ancient.

The name “ladoo” is rooted in the Sanskrit word ladduka (or lattika), which means “a small ball”. Ladoo is exactly sweet balls of the size of an apricot. This dessert is cooked of semolina, pea or wheat flour; there are numerous types and recipes. Ladoo is often cooked for celebrations and festivals.

 

Task:


This task can be performed as a team game.

Each team has to compose a route of “distribution of any kind of goodies across the globe”. Chocolate and caramel, which are described in the scan, can be offered as options. But you can add an element of data search and try to find a “route” of other culinary masterpieces: Turkish delight, halva, biscuits, gingerbread… In this case, it is necessary to increase the time for research.

To “design” the route you can use school atlases or contour maps. It is important that students do not forget the rules of mapping, carried away by “designing the image”. Therefore, you should immediately stipulate that the correctness of mapping will also be evaluated.

The same task may be given as homework.

Art/Fashion/Style

“To be rolling in it”… This aphorism has already acquired several meanings from “everything is perfect” to quite evil or ironic notes. But there are occasions when “everything is rolling in chocolate” literally. And all of it in a stylish, beautiful and unusual manner. Look at this…

In 2014, on the Eve of Valentine’s Day, in the shopping center Akropolis in Vilnius designers and chocolatiers created the interior of a traditional Lithuanian living room of its real size! It took 300 kg of chocolate. By the way, the kitten sleeping on the chair is also made of white chocolate.

 

In Geneva in 2011 a kitchen made of chocolate was created:

 

Australian photographer Carl Warner creates his masterpiece landscape of… food. And of course he couldn’t miss sweets, because they are so appetizing and beautiful! For instance, on Christmas composition powdered sugar and vanilla serve as snow, as well as coconut cookies and macaroons serve as clouds.

 

Chocolate and ice-cream:

 

Caramel, chocolate, marmalade and marshmallows:

 

“Chocolate on chocolate under chocolate”:

 

And here’s a variant of a shoe which even Cinderella wouldn’t reject! And it’s not just chocolate – it’s a work of confectionary art:

 

Here’s how they are made:

Chocolate is the material, suitable for creation of the most distinctive works of art, and not only confectionery. The contemporary fashion can boast about the whole collections of chocolate dresses and hats. Le Salon Du Chocolat is a French festival held each fall since 1994.

And in 2014 a chocolate fashion show was held in Seoul.

 

Designers, confectioners and stylists source inspiration in “sweet ideas” for creation of their masterpieces. And at the “intersection” of art and science new types of jobs and new technologies are born!

Task:


Try yourself as a designer or artist with “inclination to confectionery art”. You can use chocolate, waffles, cookies, honey cakes, coconut chips, marshmallows, marmalade as the materials… Everything sweet, delicious and “textural” is suitable.

This task can also be used as a team game. The teams receive “materials”, a sheet of culinary paper and time for creation of their sweet picture. And then they use imagination and distribution of “roles”: who draws a sketch, who works with materials. The crucial thing is not to eat “paints and brushes” before the creation of the picture!

Accelerative and interactive methods

Almost every scan of the case-lesson involves practical task or game to consolidate the educational material and acquire competencies:

Scan

Task

Geometry

Try to “guess” a pastry, more precisely its form. You should gather into teams to do it. The teams think of a form of some pastry for their opponents and describe it in “geometric language” – via formulas that characterize the surfaces of their pastries (don’t forget to draw your own sketch of a pastry). Don’t forget that you are not obliged to use complex surfaces exceptionally, you can also use relatively simple elements: parallelepipeds, cubes, spheres, cones, cylinders, pyramids!

And the opponent team has to draw their perspective of appearance of those pastries. The team that comes to the truth the closets – wins!

Technology

The teams will have to “work” as such printer. However, their material will be not chocolate or sweet dough but mass for sculpting or plasticine. So consumption of this product is not recommended. 

A teacher offers students a sample (not very complicated pastry that is produced in layers).

Now the teams have to replicate this “masterpiece”, each team member creates only one layer! So the players will have to think about strategy and calculate the required operations.

The team that accomplishes the task faster – wins. The quality and “similarity” of the pastries should be taken into account as well.

Chemistry

The task is best handled as a team game. To conduct it a teacher has to prepare a “colored puzzle”: in a graduated cylinder or a glass they prepare colored solution (e.g., green) of two colorings (blue and yellow will be suitable for creation of green).

The task for the students is to replicate this solution, using initial solutions of yellow and blue colorings. These “initial” colorings remain on the teams’ worktables. They will also need an empty “working” cylinder or glass where the students will mix their solutions to obtain the required color and shade.

They should not only replicate the color but also estimate (or even guess) the amount of each solution the teacher has mixed. The most “precise” and “accurate” team wins.

The teacher can complicate the task by giving the teams the next objective: not only to mix solutions to get the necessary color but also to calculate the concentration of this “new” solution. Then the teacher tells the students the initial concentrations of coloring solutions or the weight of the colorings in them.

It is better to limit this competition in time, estimating how long it can take in advance.

Physics/Practice of cooking

For this contest you have to use materials and methods, recommended in the scan.

As a task you can give the tams a possibility to melt chocolate and “cast” simple geometric figures (circles, squares, triangles).

The teacher can prepare sheets of culinary paper for the teams with already drawn sketches of several of such figures.

The results of the contest can be estimated in the end of the case-lesson as chocolate needs some time to cool.

An important criterion is accuracy of the performance.

History/Geography

This task is a team game.

Each team has to compose a route of “distribution of any kind of goodies across the globe”. Chocolate and caramel, which are described in the scan, can be offered as options. But you can add an element of data search and try to find a “route” of other culinary masterpieces: Turkish delight, halva, biscuits, gingerbread… In this case, it is necessary to increase the time for research.

To “design” the route you can use school atlases or contour maps. It is important that students do not forget the rules of mapping, carried away by “designing the image”. Therefore, you should immediately stipulate that the correctness of mapping will also be evaluated.

Art/Fashion/Style

 

The students are offered to try themselves as designers or artists with

“inclination to confectionery art”. They can use chocolate, waffles, cookies,

honey cakes, coconut chips, marshmallows, marmalade as the materials…

Everything sweet, delicious and “textural” is suitable.

This task can also be used as a team game. The teams receive “materials”, a sheet of culinary paper and time for creation of their sweet picture. And then they use imagination and distribution of “roles”: who draws a sketch, who works with materials. The crucial thing is not to eat “paints and brushes” before the creation of the picture!

Objective: Activate imagination and creativity, to consolidate useful information and gain practical skills, to acquire a number of competencies such as teamwork, pluralism, delegation of authority, ability to listen and hear, time management, cultivation of taste, self-control and adaptability, prioritization skills, concern for quality, personal responsibility, savvy, presentation of oneself and one’s ideas, domestic skills, ability to understand fashion and art.

Lesson’s summary

The End

«Знання завжди повинні бути свіжими!»

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